gentlewave:

A Court Lady Playing a Santour,
Attributable to the ‘Shirin Painter’, [detail], oil on canvas, 148 x 75.5 cm,
circa 1840, Qajar, Persia,
private collection, source: sothebys.com.

gentlewave:

A Court Lady Playing a Santour,

Attributable to the ‘Shirin Painter’, [detail], oil on canvas, 148 x 75.5 cm,

circa 1840, Qajar, Persia,

private collection, source: sothebys.com.

(via ayatollahofsass)



Iran - 1975

Iran - 1975

(Source: vintage-iran)


adokal:

Qajar court lady Ziaossaltaneh, one of Fathali Shah daughters from his 39th wife Mariam who was originally Jewish and converted to Islam after marriage, aka Shah Beygom Khanom.
source

adokal:

Qajar court lady Ziaossaltaneh, one of Fathali Shah daughters from his 39th wife Mariam who was originally Jewish and converted to Islam after marriage, aka Shah Beygom Khanom.

source


whatisiran:

Ceiling and walls above the tomb of Shah Nimatullah Wali.

Mahan, Kerman province.


keshmeshak:

A couple reading the Holy Quran on 19th night of Ramadan. Tehran, Iran

keshmeshak:

A couple reading the Holy Quran on 19th night of Ramadan. Tehran, Iran

(via bardaash)


houseoflovers:

to barooni to barooni, to aftabi to aftabi

(via aloofshahbanou)


"The steps that the Teheran regime took in the 1930s with the aim of Persianization of the Azeris and other minorities appeared to take a leaf from the writings of the reformist-minded intellectuals in the previous decade. In the quest of imposing national homogeneity on the country where half of the population consisted of ethnic minorities, the Pahlavi regime issued in quick succession bans on the use of Azeri on the premises of schools, in theatrical performances, religious ceremonies, and, finally, in the publication of books. Azeri was reduced to the status of a language that only could be spoken and hardly ever written. As the Persianization campaign gained momentum, it drew inspiration from the revivalist spirit of Zoroastrian national glories. There followed even more invasive official practices, such as changing Turkic-sounding geographic names and interference with giving children names other than Persian ones. While cultivating cordial relations with Kemalist Turkey, Reza Shah carried on a forceful de-Turkification campaign in Iran."

— According to Tadeusz Swietochowski, in 1930s Reza Shah Pahlavi pursued the official policy of Persianization to assimilate Azerbaijanis and other ethnic minorities in Iran (via solipsistictendencies)